Eating healthy doesn't mean that you need to deprive yourself of delicious flavors and foods. (See: Please Stop Feeling Guilty About What You Eat) Try one of these healthy desserts for a snack that satisfies your sweet tooth or—if you're really dying for that ice cream or pizza—go ahead and indulge in something "unhealthy." (Just don't make it an all-the-time thing.) Life is all about balance, right?
Smoking not only cuts your lifespan by affecting your internal organs, but it also ages you on the outside by causing skin damage. Tobacco smoking can give you wrinkles, create pucker lines around your mouth, stain your teeth and fingers, rob your skin of nutrients, break down youth-enhancing collagen and make your skin look grey. It makes you wonder how smoking is often marketed as glamorous and attractive.
According to a recent study, very few adults actually meet the criteria for a healthy lifestyle. The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, showed that only 3% of American adults got a perfect score on what the authors say are the four basic criteria for healthy living. Just 13.8% met three of the criteria; 34.2% met only two criteria. Women scored slightly better than men.
I agree with David (9th July comment) with regard to diet. Whole grains can indeed have the effect of spiking blood sugar (whole grain bread as just one example) and creating gut inflammation, and therefore low-grade, sub-acute inflammation in general. This is the biggest contributor to chronic disease that we are facing, long-term inflammation. The standard food pyramid is, in my opinion, all wrong. I believe we should eat a more Mediterranean diet, and minimise the grain-based carbohydrates, and the sugars. Then we are considerably further down the track towards a healthy diet that promotes longevity. Of course, all of the other factors mentioned are important as well, but what we put into our mouths is probably the most important, given the skyrocketing rates of obesity first world countries are facing, and now even asian countries as well, who are well and truly catching up.
hi I have really thick hair and its about 4 or 5inches right now but the only thing is ,is that i have been experiencing thinning towards the back of my head and i dont know why .And it grows at a significantly slower rate than the rest ofmy hair.ive had to wear a cap for the past couple weeks because im afraid it might all break off or fall out. if you have any advice for me please email me back

"Fallbacks" are exercise and diet options that you can fall back on if life gets in the way of your plan. Nutritionally, this may mean having a stash of Larabars in your car or desk drawer so you always have a healthy food option. When it comes to your workout routine, you may find that an a.m. workout can prevent a crazy workday or p.m. slump from convincing you to skip the gym. Take a little time today to identify three fallbacks (diet or exercise) that you can use if your day doesn't go as planned.
There are still plenty of people who are loving the whole No ‘Poo thing, and the key (I believe) is a good Apple Cider Vinegar Rinse as it will help balance the scalp after the harsher baking soda wash. I personally love the “pumped up” from Reformation Acres. If you don’t want to go all out, you can always just use a couple tablespoons of apple cider vinegar diluted in about a cup of water to rinse.
Protective styling is critical to the success of your natural hair journey. When we use the term protective styling on the Curl Centric blog, we’re referring to incorporating more “protection” into your overall natural hair regimen. The lack of focusing on protecting the hair is often the reason that several women suffer from excessive breakage and fail to grow their hair to their desired length.
Conditioners are intended to deposit protein or moisture into the hair strand to restore the hair’s strength, give your hair body and to protect your hair against possible breakage. The effects of conditioners are only temporary. The term conditioner is often used to describe many different things. For example, there are finishing rinses, cream rinses, protein conditioners, hot oil treatments, deep conditioning treatments and leave-in conditioners – and I’ve only named a few.

My advice to you: Look for ways to incorporate more protection into your natural hair regimen. Be sure that you’re being gentle with your hair at all times. I also recommend finding a few protective hairstyles that you like and frequently incorporate them into your natural hair regimen, so you can protect the ends of your hair. A significant component to growing long hair (or more accurately retaining what you’ve already grown) is mitigating hair breakage to retain the hair that you currently have and protective styling improves your ability to accomplish this goal.
I heard of a trick for trimming hair. I don’t know if it works on 4c hair. The trick was to braid your hair in medium to large braids all over your head. The part of the braid that is thin and sparse is the part to cut off. Do you recommend doing this. The reason I ask is because there are not very many natural hair salons in the area that I live in and I don’t like spending money on hair unless it’s a really good hair product.
I’ve been natural(no relaxer) for about 5 years but in those 5 years I have consistently worn a weave never giving my natural hair time to breath or be treated. I have recently decided to give the weave a break and show my hair some TLC because it needs it badly. My hair is veryy thick and not short, it actually looks and feels a bit healthy until I blow dry it then it feels brittle and very dry. Also my edges are a big problem they are so thin and brittle. I am wondering what tips you have for someone who is not necessarily newly natural but transitioning from weave/braids?
I haven’t gone natural yet, but I’m planning too very soon. Right now I’m wearing box braids. Pretty much my whole life I have been doing braids relaxers and weaves. But now I want to go natural and I’m not sure exactly where to start. Should I start by trimming split ends, brushing it all through, moisturizing my scalp, cutting off all my relaxed ends?Between my weaves and braided hairstyles, when my hair is natural for a couple of days, Iv’e noticed that it breaks off a lot becomes flat (after I wash it) and is super dry and incredibly tangled. Should I brush my hair because it’s so tangley? Or should I not because it will tear it out? I’m so lost! HELP!
Hello, I am transitioning and I really do not want to do a big chop, I have had chemicals in my hair for well over half of my life, while I know and understand this will not be an easy journey, is there anything you could give me advice wise that will shed some light while on this journey. I have seen people natural and its pretty, but most times they tell me that they have big chopped, I have a really nice length of hair and I do clip my ends often, but is there anything else that you could recommend that will help me along the way. My hair is a good mix of wiry and spongy if that makes sense, my mom has natural hair that is a little thick and curly and my dad has really fine curly hair and I guess I am the one in between with the spongy wiry combination. HELPPPPP!!!!!!!!!!!!
This information is so useful and I’m glad I accidentally found your website. I’m going to try the natural hair products you listed and see which one works best for me. My question is that–I’d like to know where I can go in Washington, DC to learn how to flat twist and two-strand twist my own hair? It cost $65 – $85 to get this done with just my own hair (with no extensions or added hair) at local natural hair salons. I read Dr. Phoenyx Austin’s book, If You Love It, It Will Grow and it seems that the key to our hair is to keep it moisturized because it is so dry.
3. DETANGLE. This is extra important for 4C girls because the tight curl pattern of your hair can cause hairs to curl and coil around each other, causing tangles. Tangles lead to breakage, which hinders growth. Detangle regularly and gently, using a wide-toothed comb on damp hair (don’t use a brush!) Use conditioners to add slip and help with the process. When you find knots, don’t yank- use your fingers to gently pull hairs out of the knot.
Choose your splurges. Sometimes you’ll be faced with indulgent foods in the moment, say, at a family event or  social get-together. Strive to differentiate between your everyday foods and your indulgences, and then determine which splurges will be most satisfying. Couples may want to talk about this decision at dinner and choose either a dessert or an alcoholic beverage, but not both.
I was 12 years old the first time I relaxed my hair. At the time, I was going to a majority Black school and I was one of the few girls who still had natural hair. Most days I came to class with my hair thrown into a haphazard ponytail or my 'little girl' pigtails and — you guessed it — I hated it. I was young, impressionable, and it was just one more thing that made me uncool, one more thing that made me different.
Carolyn, agree completely, a plant-based Mediterranean style diet is the best diet for health. That includes some whole grains, ideally in intact form (such as farro, quinoa, and brown rice), some healthy proteins and fats (legumes, nuts, seeds, fish, chicken), and mostly fruits and veggies. Refined grains, like white flour and sugar, and everything made from them (bread, pastas, backed goods, cereals, et cetera) are the real culprit.
Social conditions such as poverty, social isolation and inability to get or prepare preferred foods can cause unintentional weight loss, and this may be particularly common in older people.[43] Nutrient intake can also be affected by culture, family and belief systems.[28] Ill-fitting dentures and other dental or oral health problems can also affect adequacy of nutrition.[28]
Trying to decide what you're going to eat in the morning while you're rushing to get out the door is a recipe for diet disaster. Take 10 minutes tonight to plan out all your breakfasts for the week. Having a weekly nutrition plan will increase your likelihood of following through and eating breakfast every morning. (The 30-Day Meal Prep Challenge covers all the basics.) 
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