I’ve been natural for the past 3 years and have not seen any sort of growth whatsoever. I have a hair routine that I follow religiously every week: I apply hair food to my hairline every single night Every Sunday I apply hair food to the rest of my scalp. I would moisturize my entire scalp more often but I am still a high school student and thus don’t have enough time on my hands for that luxury.
To splurge or not to splurge? That is the perennial weight-loss question. Should you allow for occasional indulgences in your healthy-eating program, or say a firm “no” out of fear they will sabotage your results? Once you start a new regimen, it can be scary to stray from it. So how can you navigate the path of progress without veering into perfectionism? Here’s some professional counsel. 
Social conditions such as poverty, social isolation and inability to get or prepare preferred foods can cause unintentional weight loss, and this may be particularly common in older people.[43] Nutrient intake can also be affected by culture, family and belief systems.[28] Ill-fitting dentures and other dental or oral health problems can also affect adequacy of nutrition.[28]
Hi Missqeetee – On average, it is estimated that hair grows about 1/2 inch per month. This means that (if you’re the average person) your will have the possibly of 1/2 inch of growth per month that will be natural hair. It really depends on how long your hair is to determine how long it will take to grow out the relaxer (along with the growth rate). Take your current length and divide it by 1/2. This will give you a good estimate. This doesn’t account for the amount of length actually retained, which could be less than 1/2 inch per month.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your healthcare provider or 911 immediately. Any mention of products or services is not meant as a guarantee, endorsement, or recommendation of the products, services, or companies. Reliance on any information provided is solely at your own risk. Please discuss any options with your healthcare provider.

Hey Kate. Im 16 and I’ve been transitioning since April 2013. The back of my hair is natural but the front still has some relaxed ends. I get braids & leave them in for 2 or 3 months. & I oil my scalp 2 twice a Week. When I take my hair out I usually get blowouts at a Dominican salon & have them cut off some of my ends. This helps you not have to big chop until you have enough growth
Hi there, I saw your comment and realized that I use two of those products! I use kinky curly for shampoo and leave-in, shea moisture for conditioner, and several others for styling and custards and so on. I’d suggest trying each one out and seeing how they work for your hair until you find the right combination for your hair type and texture! Hope that helped:)
I agree with David (9th July comment) with regard to diet. Whole grains can indeed have the effect of spiking blood sugar (whole grain bread as just one example) and creating gut inflammation, and therefore low-grade, sub-acute inflammation in general. This is the biggest contributor to chronic disease that we are facing, long-term inflammation. The standard food pyramid is, in my opinion, all wrong. I believe we should eat a more Mediterranean diet, and minimise the grain-based carbohydrates, and the sugars. Then we are considerably further down the track towards a healthy diet that promotes longevity. Of course, all of the other factors mentioned are important as well, but what we put into our mouths is probably the most important, given the skyrocketing rates of obesity first world countries are facing, and now even asian countries as well, who are well and truly catching up.
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One way to incorporate more protection into your natural hair journey is to utilize protective hairstyles. A protective hairstyle generally requires minimal upkeep, gives you the opportunity to moisturize as needed, and it keeps the ends of your hair safe and tucked away – protected. You can successfully grow your hair quite long with the appropriate selection of products, proper styling techniques, and general handling/maintenance.
Anyone with Afro-textured hair knows that it tends to have a mind of its own. Especially when you consider that it's not uncommon for folks with that type of texture to have more than one curl pattern growing from their scalps. You might have looser curls in the back and tighter coils in the front. You may have hair that wants to frizz at your crown but is super defined at your temples. It can get confusing. But fortunately, there are loads of hair-care products out that will help keep your 'fro looking fabulous and your hair super healthy — no matter what it wants to do with itself. We've rounded up the best of everything you need: Leave-in conditioners, oils, gels, shampoos, wide-tooth combs, and oh so much more. Click through for the 27 hair products folks with highly textured hair depend on to keep their strands looking like absolute perfection.
Thanks for sharing your experience! Based on what you have shared, you are on the right track. I would like to also encourage you to use products that work best for your hair and that gives you the results you are looking for. A product that works great for one natural maybe completely wrong for another. So I encourage both you and A to experiment and let your hair decide what products you need to use or avoid.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your healthcare provider or 911 immediately. Any mention of products or services is not meant as a guarantee, endorsement, or recommendation of the products, services, or companies. Reliance on any information provided is solely at your own risk. Please discuss any options with your healthcare provider.
It doesn't matter how many hours you spend at the gym each week: if you don't clean up your diet, you will not see the results you want! A study from the University of Texas found that without dietary control, people who completed a 12-week program of resistance training and high-intensity interval training lost a disappointing 1 percent of body fat. Don't let your hard work go to waste! (That's exactly why Harley Pasternak says working out is the least important part of losing weight.)
When Isis Brantley won the fight for the freedom to braid hair in Texas, she helped pave the way toward financial independence not only for herself, but for braiders, no longer constrained by regulations requiring cosmetology licensing. Her story is not just about braid freedom, but about financial freedom, a gift that she wants to share with others.
Hi Missqeetee – On average, it is estimated that hair grows about 1/2 inch per month. This means that (if you’re the average person) your will have the possibly of 1/2 inch of growth per month that will be natural hair. It really depends on how long your hair is to determine how long it will take to grow out the relaxer (along with the growth rate). Take your current length and divide it by 1/2. This will give you a good estimate. This doesn’t account for the amount of length actually retained, which could be less than 1/2 inch per month. 

Another explanation is curl pattern and texture. I personally have at least 3 that I can identify… lol My front is straight on the ends and the longer it goes, the straighter it gets. I cut a few inches about 3 years ago because I thought it was heat damaged, but it wasn’t. It is still strand in the front. I just accept the straightness and work with it. Now my crown area has a coarser texture, the most shrinkage and the tightest curls.
Detox – If you are new to natural shampooing or no ‘poo then you have to be prepared for a detox phase. Commercial shampoos strip your hair and scalp of their natural oils, which is why most people feel the need to shampoo daily. As your hair is stripped of oils the body signals for the scalp to produce more. In other words: The harsher the shampoo the more oils your body produces. As you wean yourself from commercial shampoos it will take time for your body to re-balance itself and stop producing so much oil. In the meantime you can expect extra grease and general “gross” hair until your body balances back out. This can take anywhere from 2 – 9 weeks. (Yep… this is not for the faint of heart.) The good news is that once your body finds its balance you can expect more manageable hair with only “shampooing” every couple of days (or even only once or twice a week.)
Thanks for sharing your experience! Based on what you have shared, you are on the right track. I would like to also encourage you to use products that work best for your hair and that gives you the results you are looking for. A product that works great for one natural maybe completely wrong for another. So I encourage both you and A to experiment and let your hair decide what products you need to use or avoid.
Curl Centric is about helping you understand your natural hair and providing you with information and resources to achieve healthy natural hair. We often interview other naturals on the blog because we want to give everyone the opportunity to share their experiences with natural hair. We often learn the most by reading and analyzing other people’s experiences.
There are still plenty of people who are loving the whole No ‘Poo thing, and the key (I believe) is a good Apple Cider Vinegar Rinse as it will help balance the scalp after the harsher baking soda wash. I personally love the “pumped up” from Reformation Acres. If you don’t want to go all out, you can always just use a couple tablespoons of apple cider vinegar diluted in about a cup of water to rinse.

“Clearly, the greatest cancer risks are concentrated in the heavy and moderate drinker categories. Nevertheless, some cancer risk persists even at low levels of consumption. A meta-analysis that focused solely on cancer risks associated with drinking one drink or fewer per day observed that this level of alcohol consumption was still associated with some elevated risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, oropharyngeal cancer, and breast cancer, but no discernable associations were seen for cancers of the colorectum, larynx, and liver. On the basis of the lesser overall cancer risk at the lower end of the dose-response continuum, the World Cancer Research Fund/AICR made the following recommendation: ‘If alcoholic drinks are consumed, limit consumption to two drinks a day for men and one drink a day for women.'” You can check out the entire article here: http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.2017.76.1155
There's good reason why hairstylist Andre Walker won seven daytime Emmy awards for his work with Oprah for The Oprah Winfrey Show. He's a master at styling hair. And his hair-care line for curly hair ain't bad neither. The standout product hands down is the Quench Essential Oil that's infused with mongongo oil (which means it's great for your skin, too).
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