I too have transitioned into the natural world without the BIG chop. I didn’t want to lose my length for those moments when I want to straighten my hair or rock a messy bun. It’s rough because now you have to deal with shrinkage closer to the roots and loose strands surrounding, but it is doable. I’ve been natural now for 1 year…and I absolutely LOVE my hair!! My nautal highlights are very profound and it’s very flattering. Especially since I’ve noticed my hair gets lighter as I get older. I have natural auburn and blonde highlights mixed heavily into my sandy brown hair. It’s always been naturally lighter in the warmer months, but it’s now lighter all year. I take advantage of my natural highlights and incorporate it into my natural texture and rock mostly a rebellious look. Hair speaks and mine speaks Loud 🙂 Have fun!
Then there’s the issue of what could be done with it if this actually happens. Transitioning would make styling easier, no doubt, but I’m fairly sold on the big chop. School starts in a month and I’m not too keen on waltzing into a place with roughly 1,000 judgemental teenagers looking at me with my hypothetical mini afro, ~surprisingly~ policy-conforming skirt (at least knee length), and bag laden with unnecessary junk. I was thinking singles but I’m not sure I can convince the rents to let me cut off most of my hair~and~ pay a hundred? dollars to get someone to do what’s left. We don’t do much weaves in my house and I’ve never expressed particular interest in this so I don’t know how they’ll react.
Intentional weight loss is the loss of total body mass as a result of efforts to improve fitness and health, or to change appearance through slimming. Weight loss in individuals who are overweight or obese can reduce health risks,[1] increase fitness,[2] and may delay the onset of diabetes.[1] It could reduce pain and increase movement in people with osteoarthritis of the knee.[2] Weight loss can lead to a reduction in hypertension (high blood pressure), however whether this reduces hypertension-related harm is unclear.[1][not in citation given]

Each head of hair is different, so there is really no correct answer. However, you can tell when you’re washing your hair too much if it starts to get dull, which means it’s time to scale back on the shampooing. By over-washing your hair, you can wash away your hair’s natural moisture which helps your hair look healthy. If you’re not washing your hair often enough, you can have product build-up which could negatively impact your hair.


Despite what most people say, muscle does not weigh more than fat! One pound of muscle and one pound of fat both weigh—no surprise—one pound. The biggest difference is that a pound of muscle takes up much less space than a pound of fat. The lesson? Focus on the way your body feels and how your clothes fit rather than the number on the scale. (Here's everything you need to know about building muscle and burning fat.)
Certain hairstyles can do a number on your hair. “Pulling the hair back [in a tight style] can damage follicles around the hairline,” explains Prestonia. In fact, any sort of style that tugs on hair, like combing and brushing it, can cause breakage. Not to say that you should swear off ponytails forever, but try to avoid wearing a style that’s harsh on your strands multiple days in a row.
Comparison of patients who have maintained their weight loss more than re-gainers shows that the subjects in first group stay late less at night, have increased physical activity after weight loss, drink less sugar sweetened beverages, eat less calorie from protein, and they have more emotional support. Losing more weight during weight loss, monitoring weight, and choosing healthy foods are supposed to be important factors for successful weight maintenance.[13] The calorie intake of those who do not gain weight is less than obese and overweight people.[28] Other habits consist of using less fat and refined grains, while consuming more fiber, whole grains, vegetables, and fruits.[29]

Cleansing with harsh shampoos can strip the hair of its natural oils leading to dry, thirsty, and unhappy strands. This detangling co-wash — which is made with natural oils and preservatives — works on thin, thick, or curly hair and removes icky impurities (goodbye spin class sweat) without leaving strands totally dehydrated. Pro tip: It's best used between shampoos.


Then there are other elements to add to the list. A healthy person also knows how to manage stress, gets good quality sleep each night, doesn't drink too much, doesn't sit too much—basically, does everything in moderation all the time. When you look at everything that could possibly go into a healthy lifestyle, you can see just how hard all of those things are in our current world.

I would like to say that I and all 4 of my daughters, which are all grown have natural hair. We do not use relaxers which strip and deplete the natural beauty of hair. I personally have found that cocoa butter (natural) is perfect for moisturizing my scalp and adding that luster to my hair as well as helping my hair to resist breakage and strengthening it. It has (my hair) grown by leaps and bounds. I suggest cocoa butter after shampooing. It also brings out the natural waves in my hair. I would not use anything else.
An increase in fiber intake is also recommended for regulating bowel movements. Other methods of weight loss include use of drugs and supplements that decrease appetite, block fat absorption, or reduce stomach volume. Bariatric surgery may be indicated in cases of severe obesity. Two common bariatric surgical procedures are gastric bypass and gastric banding.[13] Both can be effective at limiting the intake of food energy by reducing the size of the stomach, but as with any surgical procedure both come with their own risks[14] that should be considered in consultation with a physician. Dietary supplements, though widely used, are not considered a healthy option for weight loss.[15] Many are available, but very few are effective in the long term.[16]
Jump up ^ Mann, T; Tomiyama, AJ; Westling, E; Lew, AM; Samuels, B; Chatman, J (April 2007). "Medicare's search for effective obesity treatments: diets are not the answer". The American Psychologist. 62 (3): 220–33. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.666.7484. doi:10.1037/0003-066x.62.3.220. PMID 17469900. In sum, there is little support for the notion that diets ["severely restricting one’s calorie intake"] lead to lasting weight loss or health benefits.
If your hair is extra coarse, thick, and/or dry, you’ve probably tried coconut oil as a treatment. Here’s one better: Siam Seas’ Coconut Shampoo and Hair Treatment combine cold-pressed virgin coconut oil, a distillation of coconut fatty acids, and B vitamins to cleanse, smooth, and moisturize in the gentlest way possible. Plus, unlike the stuff straight from your pantry, the shampoo works into a satisfying foamy lather and the conditioner feels more like a cream lotion, not a greasy slick.
Hi! I found this article to be very helpful. I’ve been thinking about going natural for awhile now but I have a few concerns because I’m on a few medications that affect hair growth. When I first began the medication my former stylist cut my hair (which was longer at the time) but ever since then my hair hasn’t been able to grow nearly as much. Do you think going natural would help?
Other factors – There can be other factors that I can’t necessarily account for. It could be a combination of detox, water, ingredients, and method…. but unless I can talk to you face to face, see you mix your ingredients together, check your water, and watch you shower… I won’t necessarily know why something isn’t working for you. (And let’s  be honest, that would be really awkward.)  Ultimately, if you are serious about natural hair care you have to be willing to experiment and keep trying until you find your sweet spot.
Curl Centric recommends The Science of Black Hair for new naturals who want to quickly understand how to care for their natural hair, how to grow longer hair and how to get started with a healthy product regimen. This book is a well-research, reference guide for ladies serious about hair care. Use this link to learn more about The Science of Black Hair.

With all the creams, potions, and oils we use to style and maintain our hair, there's bound to be some product buildup — and this micro-exfoliating shampoo (which works on all hair types,) is here to nip it in the bud. Sulfate-free and infused with both charcoal and coconut oil, think of it almost like a juice cleanse for the scalp: The charcoal draws out impurities from the scalp and hair follicles, vegetable-derived micro-exfoliators remove dead skin cells and buildup, and soothing peppermint and spearmint oils give your scalp a nice cooling treat.
Hi there, I saw your comment and realized that I use two of those products! I use kinky curly for shampoo and leave-in, shea moisture for conditioner, and several others for styling and custards and so on. I’d suggest trying each one out and seeing how they work for your hair until you find the right combination for your hair type and texture! Hope that helped:)
Meal replacement — based dietary intervention compared to a structured diet and exercise program for both weight loss and maintenance had no distinctive influences on appetite, fullness, diet satisfaction, and quality. The structured diet group lost significantly more weight and maintained greater weight loss, but they reported more physical activity too that may have affected the results.[17]

Detox – If you are new to natural shampooing or no ‘poo then you have to be prepared for a detox phase. Commercial shampoos strip your hair and scalp of their natural oils, which is why most people feel the need to shampoo daily. As your hair is stripped of oils the body signals for the scalp to produce more. In other words: The harsher the shampoo the more oils your body produces. As you wean yourself from commercial shampoos it will take time for your body to re-balance itself and stop producing so much oil. In the meantime you can expect extra grease and general “gross” hair until your body balances back out. This can take anywhere from 2 – 9 weeks. (Yep… this is not for the faint of heart.) The good news is that once your body finds its balance you can expect more manageable hair with only “shampooing” every couple of days (or even only once or twice a week.)
1. RETAIN MOISTURE. Even if you have low porosity hair, 4C hair needs to be kept moisturized. The kinks and coils of 4C curls prevent the distribution of sebum (natural oil produced by your scalp) throughout your hair. This allows your hair to dry out faster than other curl patterns, so you need to take extra precautions to keep your hair moisturized. Find a good moisturizer AND a good sealant. Oils like coconut oil and olive oil, and creams like Shea butter are effective at sealing moisture in your hair. If you wear a protective style, don’t forget to moisturize regularly!
It’s also important not to use indulgences as a reward for eating healthy. It’s better to own the reality that you consumed an indulgent food and that it has an assigned place in your healthy life than to justify its consumption because you ate well all week long. If indulgent choices still elicit guilt, you might ask yourself if your eating plan is too restrictive.
Hi. I really loved your article about how to take care of natural hair but right now I’m transitioning from permed to natural hair, so right now my roots are curly but the rest is straight and my sister told me that my hair is dead, so I was wondering if you knew how to revive it. I also wanted to learn about the process of taking care of your hair. My hair gets dry very fast, and I tend to get split ends very easily. I use argan shampoo and conditioner but I’m not sure it’s the right product for my hair. So my questions are

Eighteen years ago, I was arrested by seven undercover cops, handcuffed and dragged out of my own salon in Texas. I was guilty of the "crime" of braiding hair without a cosmetology license. Today, I'm free. U.S. Judge Sam Sparks ruled that Texas Braiding Laws were unconstitutional. This fight for the right to teach the next generation braiding is today's modern day civil rights movement!


Being fit gives you a distinct metabolic advantage at a cellular level. Fit people have a greater number of mitochondria — the energy factories within our cells. Mitochondria handle the aerobic oxidation of fatty acids (fat burning!) that occurs even when we’re at rest. Thus, increasing the number of mitochondria through exercise helps raise our metabolism so we burn more calories — not only with every workout session, but also when we’re not exercising at all.
As it turns out, healthy habits make a big difference. According to this analysis, people who met criteria for all five habits enjoyed significantly, impressively longer lives than those who had none: 14 years for women and 12 years for men (if they had these habits at age 50). People who had none of these habits were far more likely to die prematurely from cancer or cardiovascular disease.
Carolyn, agree completely, a plant-based Mediterranean style diet is the best diet for health. That includes some whole grains, ideally in intact form (such as farro, quinoa, and brown rice), some healthy proteins and fats (legumes, nuts, seeds, fish, chicken), and mostly fruits and veggies. Refined grains, like white flour and sugar, and everything made from them (bread, pastas, backed goods, cereals, et cetera) are the real culprit.
Damage to the hair must be trimmed away or grown out. For example, there is not a permanent cure for split-ends. There are some conditioners that can essentially patch split-ends and make them less visible, but over a period of time those split-ends will reappear. The only way to permanently get rid of your split-ends is to trim them away. You should absolutely never burn away your split-ends.

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is one of the diets that have been studied for weight maintenance. This diet includes consuming more vegetables, fruits, and low-fat dairy products. Following this diet helps patients to achieve[35,36] and maintain weight loss and this effect has been related to dairy products rather than fiber.[37]
Hi my name is Brenda and I am transitioning. It has been about 8 months since I have had a relaxer in my hair. I recently started using As I am, about 2 days ago. After finding that cantu jus don’t work for me. I am looking for a good regimen. I guess what I am saying is that I am clueless about going natural. I do know that I have a curl pattern already and my hair is thick and course. I do trim my hair about every month but I do know the perm is still on my ends or shall I say through out my hair. As far as a regimen I don’t have one. I just wash my hair once a week with Tressme and conditioner with tressemee, then I put the leave in conditioner–As I Am following with the As I Am double butter cream. Then I put twist in it. I take the twist out daily and re-twist. Please Help!!!!!!!
Repeated dieting can actually lower metabolism and thus make your body retain more of what you put into it. Increasing exercise while not giving your body more food to compensate can also increase body fat storage. Dieting also increases heart disease risk, when compared to simply gaining a little weight. If you really need to lose weight, the most effective way is to increase exercise and cutting only a little food, while concentrating on fruits, veggies, and high fiber foods.
I really like the article could you put in some protective hairstyles that are authorized by the military? The reason alot of women serving in the military don’t go natural and suffer breakage from constantly wearing braids and weaves is because we think we have no choice. Yet our hair must be off the collar and can’t be viewed by superiors to be bulky or unkempt. ANy help you can lend to this would be appreciated.
Carolyn, agree completely, a plant-based Mediterranean style diet is the best diet for health. That includes some whole grains, ideally in intact form (such as farro, quinoa, and brown rice), some healthy proteins and fats (legumes, nuts, seeds, fish, chicken), and mostly fruits and veggies. Refined grains, like white flour and sugar, and everything made from them (bread, pastas, backed goods, cereals, et cetera) are the real culprit.
Hair-care devotees know all about the importance of a good deep conditioner, but hot oil treatments don't get nearly enough love. While you can create an effective one for yourself by mixing your favorite oils, this treatment from Taliah Waajid eliminates all of the guesswork that comes with homemade concoctions. Just distribute a decent amount of this throughout your cleansed hair, throw on a shower cap, and sit under a hooded dryer for 15 to 20 minutes so it can deeply penetrate your hair shaft.
The good news is, you don't have to change everything at the same time. In fact, the trick to healthy living is making small changes—taking more steps each day, adding fruit to your cereal, having an extra glass of water, or saying no to that second helping of buttery mashed potatoes. One thing you can do right now to make your lifestyle healthier is to move more.
Not only is this product named well, but it also smells like cake batter, which is sweet in every sense of the word. You can use Knot Sauce on dry or damp hair. Work in sections to lightly detangle with your fingers, and feel all those pesky knots melt away. This stuff uses a blend of plant-based ingredients to help soften the hair and can also be used as a leave-in conditioner.

Sleep may be one of the most important, yet often overlooked, components of getting lean. Sleep helps your muscles recover. What's more, according to a 2010 study from the University of Chicago, skipping sleep can sabotage your efforts to lose fat through dieting. You should aim for seven to eight hours of quality sleep every night, so it your top priority tonight. (See: Why Sleep Is the Most Important Thing for Weight Loss and Overall Health)
Speaking of color-treating — doing it to your hair without using a mask afterwards is like taking a shot and skipping the chaser. “Coloring hair strips it of moisture and strength,” explains Prestonia. “Follow up your color services with a hair mask.” One like SheaMoisture Manuka Honey & Mafura Oil Intense Hydration Masque, $13, is mega-moisturizing — it’s basically the hair equivalent of chugging a bottle of water the morning after a GNO.
Hello! I’m African and I transitioned to natural hair (chopped, grew, relaxed once then grew it natural) two years ago. My hair grows really fast, is curly and my scalp is sensitive and itchy – it’s been so since my teenage years. When i braid or weave my hair, it itches a lot more especially just after & in the first week, so I can’t carry it for long as it gets rough quickly. The same for fixing weaves. As a result I try to avoid doing those but I end up just tying my hair in a bun/ponytail and the curly short strands are flying around which is kind of boring and not suited to the work environment. Plus! My hair is grey, I have grey strands all over intermingled with (more) black (this is hereditary). I haven’t really taken care of my hair well, ‘cos it’s resilient () but I want to change that now – I’d really like to know what can take away the itching and generally how to take care of my hair
Then there are other elements to add to the list. A healthy person also knows how to manage stress, gets good quality sleep each night, doesn't drink too much, doesn't sit too much—basically, does everything in moderation all the time. When you look at everything that could possibly go into a healthy lifestyle, you can see just how hard all of those things are in our current world.
The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is one of the diets that have been studied for weight maintenance. This diet includes consuming more vegetables, fruits, and low-fat dairy products. Following this diet helps patients to achieve[35,36] and maintain weight loss and this effect has been related to dairy products rather than fiber.[37]
Hello. I absolutely love this website. i think i’ve been through all your posts already and comments. lol! I have them all saved and i’ve made my own notes. I can’t even start by describing my hair texture. I’m a 21 year old white girl, leaving in Seychelles. I was born with beautiful curly blonde hair (they called me Goldilocks back in my youth days). I was still so young, my mum was the one who always combed by hair to go to school in the mornings, by the time i was 10, my hair was really long and she got fed up with detangling. She decided straight hair was more manageable so she had my beautiful hair relaxed without even thinking about the concequences. We live next to the beach and here in Seychelles the weather is very hot and sunny, so you can imagine what that contributed to my hair. My hair was ruined. After a while she had it cut really short, but it never went back to the way it was. So she kept taking me to hairdressers to have it relaxed. After a while everyone kept criticising my hair, especially my family who doesn’t understand the struggle of it cause they have straight silky hair. Everyone always has something to say. I stoppped relaxing my hair about five years ago or so, and a hairdresser suggested i try out a relaxer perm. It was okay when it was done but after two weeks or so my hair would simply go back to the way it was. And then they suggested i do Keratin. The last time i’ve been to the hairdresser was in December 2015. I was so fustrated with my hair and poeple who didn’t understand that my hair is just simply damaged and dry and that no matter what i do in it, it will not go back to the way it was .EVER! So i decided to just stop everything and go natural. Ofcourse i had no idea what that meant! I had never dyed my hair so i decided this was my last chance to ever have my hair dyed if i wanted to go natural,and i was thinking it would be easier to distinguish between the damaged parts to the new growth. My natural hair is about four inches long now. And theres alot of breakage and shredding. To tell you the truth i was so scared. I kept asking myself, WHAT THE H*LL WERE YOU THINKING? lol. i went to yet another hairdresser who is considered good here in Seychelles and he suggested i do Keratin ( Thats what i heard) and my mum heard ( Carotine) ???? He told me to come back this week to have it done. But i won’t. i don’t want to dissapoint myself again. I havn’t chopped my hair yet. the right side is bra lengh and the left side is somewhere shorter and at the top of my head, well, it’s really short. all of it is shredded. i have to pin in when i go to work or school.Im just too scared to cut my hair even though i know i should. I don’t have the courage yet. But i’m really very happy i’ve stumbled upon your website. I feel more confident about my hair. Finally, i can stop feeling bad about my hair. Sometimes i just feel like i don’t fit in especially with Family. They just don’t understand how my hair is now. But i’ve made peace with it. I accept it now, all thanks to this website. So thank you… ALOT! Pease keep the posts coming. I wish i could send you a picture. Could you please advice on natural hair treatments i can do at home. Here in Seychelles, they don’t have good hair products or if they do, i don’t know which ones are good. Would be great if you could advice me!
Low-calorie diets are also referred to as balanced percentage diets. Due to their minimal detrimental effects, these types of diets are most commonly recommended by nutritionists. In addition to restricting calorie intake, a balanced diet also regulates macronutrient consumption. From the total number of allotted daily calories, it is recommended that 55% should come from carbohydrates, 15% from protein, and 30% from fats with no more than 10% of total fat coming from saturated forms.[citation needed] For instance, a recommended 1,200 calorie diet would supply about 660 calories from carbohydrates, 180 from protein, and 360 from fat. Some studies suggest that increased consumption of protein can help ease hunger pangs associated with reduced caloric intake by increasing the feeling of satiety.[4] Calorie restriction in this way has many long-term benefits. After reaching the desired body weight, the calories consumed per day may be increased gradually, without exceeding 2,000 net (i.e. derived by subtracting calories burned by physical activity from calories consumed). Combined with increased physical activity, low-calorie diets are thought to be most effective long-term, unlike crash diets, which can achieve short-term results, at best. Physical activity could greatly enhance the efficiency of a diet. The healthiest weight loss regimen, therefore, is one that consists of a balanced diet and moderate physical activity.[citation needed]
Thanks for sharing your experience! Based on what you have shared, you are on the right track. I would like to also encourage you to use products that work best for your hair and that gives you the results you are looking for. A product that works great for one natural maybe completely wrong for another. So I encourage both you and A to experiment and let your hair decide what products you need to use or avoid.
Low-calorie diets: It is harmful to reduce your daily calorie intake lower than 1400 calories per day, because your body adjusts to a semi-starvation state and looks for alternative sources of energy. In addition to burning fat, your body will eventually burn muscle tissue. Because your heart is a muscle, prolonged starvation will weaken it and interfere with its normal rhythms. Low-calorie diets don't meet the body's nutrition needs, and without nutrients your body cannot function normally.
Lydia – Congrats on your BC. I hope your natural hair journey is going well. Sometimes it can take a little time to figure out exactly how to care for your hair. There are several things that could potentially cause dry/dull hair. Let’s talk specifically about your hair care routine. Which products are you using within your regimen? How are you caring for your hair?
One of methods that have been used a lot for preventing weight gain is meal replacement. It is safe, efficient, cost-effective, and without any side effects.[3,15] In this method the level of compliance is better, the receipt of nutrient intake is sufficient, and the drop-out rate is low.[15,16] The calorie density of these meals is controlled and they are also nutrient-dense. Main meals and snacks can be replaced by these nutritionally balanced low-fat meals. Table 1 shows the meal replacement trials for weight maintenance.
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