Congrats on your decision to go natural. Since you’re newly natural, this article is definitely the best place to start. As far as going natural, you can do that a couple of different ways: big chop or transition. Now you have already made the decision to transition – which is perfectly fine. Many women decide to transition and go on to have very successful natural journeys, so please don’t think that you have to big chop (in the traditional sense) to have pretty natural hair.

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Do you habitually eat lunch at your desk or in front of the TV? A 2011 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that people who multitask while eating lunch (study participants played solitaire) felt less full and ate more food 30 minutes later than those who were not distracted during lunch. Next time you sit down to eat, do just that—and nothing else. Taking 10 minutes to focus on and enjoy the food you're eating will leave you more satisfied and more in control of your appetite. (It's called mindful eating, and here's how you do it.)
Set a weekly goal for activity. To build your confidence, "make the first goal so easy that you say, 'I know I can do that,'" Williams suggests. She recommends weekly goals because if you set a daily goal and miss a day, you might get discouraged; weekly goals give you more day-to-day flexibility. And at the end of the week, reward yourself with a visual reminder of your accomplishment, such as buying flowers for yourself.
Damage to the hair must be trimmed away or grown out. For example, there is not a permanent cure for split-ends. There are some conditioners that can essentially patch split-ends and make them less visible, but over a period of time those split-ends will reappear. The only way to permanently get rid of your split-ends is to trim them away. You should absolutely never burn away your split-ends.
There are problems with some of the advice that’s typically given out online. Some natural hair advisors or product manufacturers will tell you that you need to find the perfect products (sometimes called holy grail products) or simply master a specific technique, like protective styling or the baggy method, to have a successful natural hair journey.
Due to some rather unfortunate salon perms I got in the past, my edges are weak. If I pull my hair back for more than a few days I notice thinning. Most of the protective styles that I see involve having the hair pulled back/up. This is great for protecting ends, but is there a protective style to protect edges? Right now I have my hair in twists and loose.
Thank you for your comment! Depending on the look you are going for, will greatly determine if you want to add a water base product or an oil base product to your hair. When my hair is in a wash & go type style, I can add water based products. However, when I am wearing a stretched style and I do not want shrinkage, I will use an oil based product, staying clear of wetness.
Many patients will be in pain and have a loss of appetite after surgery.[26] Part of the body's response to surgery is to direct energy to wound healing, which increases the body's overall energy requirements.[26] Surgery affects nutritional status indirectly, particularly during the recovery period, as it can interfere with wound healing and other aspects of recovery.[26][30] Surgery directly affects nutritional status if a procedure permanently alters the digestive system.[26] Enteral nutrition (tube feeding) is often needed.[26] However a policy of 'nil by mouth' for all gastrointestinal surgery has not been shown to benefit, with some suggestion it might hinder recovery.[38]
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