Hi. I really loved your article about how to take care of natural hair but right now I’m transitioning from permed to natural hair, so right now my roots are curly but the rest is straight and my sister told me that my hair is dead, so I was wondering if you knew how to revive it. I also wanted to learn about the process of taking care of your hair. My hair gets dry very fast, and I tend to get split ends very easily. I use argan shampoo and conditioner but I’m not sure it’s the right product for my hair. So my questions are
Cancer, a very common and sometimes fatal cause of unexplained (idiopathic) weight loss. About one-third of unintentional weight loss cases are secondary to malignancy. Cancers to suspect in patients with unexplained weight loss include gastrointestinal, prostate, hepatobiliary (hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreatic cancer), ovarian, hematologic or lung malignancies.
The great ability of a twa is that the style within itself is a protective style. The hairs are tightly together packed down and the hair is not brushing the shoulders. So in essence, a TWA is a protective style within itself. The idea is to be sure to protect your hair at night and keep it moisturized and supple and using protein when you need to. You didn’t mention protein. How are you incorporating protein into your regimen.

Detox – If you are new to natural shampooing or no ‘poo then you have to be prepared for a detox phase. Commercial shampoos strip your hair and scalp of their natural oils, which is why most people feel the need to shampoo daily. As your hair is stripped of oils the body signals for the scalp to produce more. In other words: The harsher the shampoo the more oils your body produces. As you wean yourself from commercial shampoos it will take time for your body to re-balance itself and stop producing so much oil. In the meantime you can expect extra grease and general “gross” hair until your body balances back out. This can take anywhere from 2 – 9 weeks. (Yep… this is not for the faint of heart.) The good news is that once your body finds its balance you can expect more manageable hair with only “shampooing” every couple of days (or even only once or twice a week.)


Being fit gives you a distinct metabolic advantage at a cellular level. Fit people have a greater number of mitochondria — the energy factories within our cells. Mitochondria handle the aerobic oxidation of fatty acids (fat burning!) that occurs even when we’re at rest. Thus, increasing the number of mitochondria through exercise helps raise our metabolism so we burn more calories — not only with every workout session, but also when we’re not exercising at all. 

A very good read. I think you hit the nail on the head and perhaps a few people’s fingers with your comments. USA has about 5% of the world’s population yet issues about 50% of all medical prescriptions worldwide. Common sense would tell us that the more people are well the less the need for public health, medicines and health facilities. An inverse relationship exists which implies an impressive health bill an indication of sickness not wellness. Public health can only be realistically addressed by governments acting in the public’s interest. The amount of money paid to political parties by lobbyists is very tiny compared to the money paid by the health budget and tax payer. Corporations need a cultural shift and to be aware of the growing dissatisfaction by health advocates trying to protect the general public.
Taking out hair extensions isn’t as simple as just pulling them out, since they may have compromised fragile, natural hair while you wore them. “Extensions can be drying to the hair because of the harsh chemicals used to manufacture and color them,” says Prestonia. She recommends deep-conditioning your hair as soon as you remove them. It’ll be worth the extra time in your routine.
You mentioned breakage. Aside from the breakage from weaves and braids, they are probably experiencing breakage at the line of demarcation (were the relaxer meets the natural hair). This is definitely one of the weakest points of the hair during transitioning. If this is the case, I would definitely suggest deciding whether you prefer to wear your hair straight or wear it curly. This will help minimize the stress that is put on maintaining more than one type of hair on the head. Also, keep the hair conditioned as much as possible.
You mentioned breakage. Aside from the breakage from weaves and braids, they are probably experiencing breakage at the line of demarcation (were the relaxer meets the natural hair). This is definitely one of the weakest points of the hair during transitioning. If this is the case, I would definitely suggest deciding whether you prefer to wear your hair straight or wear it curly. This will help minimize the stress that is put on maintaining more than one type of hair on the head. Also, keep the hair conditioned as much as possible.

Hi there – I would recommend using a clarifying shampoo to remove product buildup if any. Follow up with a moisturizing deep conditioner. From there, every 1-2 days, use the LOC or LOC method to moisturize your hair (try both to see which one works best for your hair). Wash your hair with a gentle shampoo and use a moisturizing deep conditioner every week. Follow the directions on the packaging. Avoid silicones. Examine your ends every 6-8 weeks and trim if needed. Use a gentle clarifying shampoo once a month or so. There is so much info out there about various routines, but this is a simple start that you can add to and adjust as you go. Keeping a journal to track what works and what doesn’t is great advice. Best of luck!


Certain hairstyles can do a number on your hair. “Pulling the hair back [in a tight style] can damage follicles around the hairline,” explains Prestonia. In fact, any sort of style that tugs on hair, like combing and brushing it, can cause breakage. Not to say that you should swear off ponytails forever, but try to avoid wearing a style that’s harsh on your strands multiple days in a row.


Water and water-based infusions which are called distillates or aqueous extracts, are used as fillers and are literally used to ‘fill your bottle up’ inexpensively. Water-based solutions are vulnerable to spoilage so preservatives like paraben and sodium benzoate must be added to the product. Don’t expect water quality to be high either. Your most likely looking at tap water being used, which means your products likely contain chorine and fluoride along with a multitude of other toxins.
There are problems with some of the advice that’s typically given out online. Some natural hair advisors or product manufacturers will tell you that you need to find the perfect products (sometimes called holy grail products) or simply master a specific technique, like protective styling or the baggy method, to have a successful natural hair journey.
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