The single best thing you can do for natural hair is — you guessed it — conditioning. From conditioning in the shower to regular deep-conditioning treatments, your hair can’t get enough. “Leave-in conditioners are a great way to rehydrate and bring moisture and vibrancy to your hair on a daily basis,” explains Prestonia. “For best results, dampen your hair with water before applying it.” Go for a nourishing, fatty acid-rich formula like SheaMoisture Jamaican Black Castor Oil Leave-In Conditioner, $11.
Assess your activity. How much physical activity do you get in a typical week? How intense is that activity? How much variety do you get in your activity, and how much do you enjoy it? The CDC recommends that adults get at least two and a half hours per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity or one hour and 15 minutes per week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity, plus muscle-strengthening activities at least two days per week.
For those of you just starting out on the natural hair care journey, you are bound to see “No ‘Poo” everywhere you go. Don’t worry, it does NOT have anything to do with your bowels. It’s a short term for “No Shampoo.” The most common approach to No ‘Poo is using baking soda for washing and an apple cider vinegar rinse. I personally do not like this method as the baking soda was so harsh on my scalp. I later learned that it’s because it’s not in line with our scalp’s natural pH. That’s why I created my pH Balanced Shampoo recipe. Some people, however, LOVE the baking soda method… and I say, “If’ it’s not broke, don’t fix it.”  If you still haven’t found the best method for you, stick with me. I have lots of ideas in the second part of this post.
My name is Latrice (aka Ms Lala) and I am here to help you on your hair growth journey.  I have had natural hair for over 12 years.  I grew my hair long with a simple method I call the 3 M’s of Hair Care- Minimize Breakage, Maximize Growth, Maintain Progress.  Take the quiz below to determine where you should start on your journey to long healthy hair. 

Thirteen year old Lexi Proctor wrote a book that encouraged self-love among young girls, Curly Girls Love Your Curls. After seeing the impact of that book, Lexi and her mother Monica were inspired to create a line of hair care products for all the Curlanistas of the world. With Lexi’s background as a STEM student, they took their homemade concoctions and developed a hair care line to help girls’ curls pop non-stop!
Curl Centric recommends The Science of Black Hair for new naturals who want to quickly understand how to care for their natural hair, how to grow longer hair and how to get started with a healthy product regimen. This book is a well-research, reference guide for ladies serious about hair care. Use this link to learn more about The Science of Black Hair.
Hi there, I saw your comment and realized that I use two of those products! I use kinky curly for shampoo and leave-in, shea moisture for conditioner, and several others for styling and custards and so on. I’d suggest trying each one out and seeing how they work for your hair until you find the right combination for your hair type and texture! Hope that helped:)
One way to incorporate more protection into your natural hair journey is to utilize protective hairstyles. A protective hairstyle generally requires minimal upkeep, gives you the opportunity to moisturize as needed, and it keeps the ends of your hair safe and tucked away – protected. You can successfully grow your hair quite long with the appropriate selection of products, proper styling techniques, and general handling/maintenance.

Whether more dairy intake is a predictor of successful weight maintenance, is unclear.[33] Food variety is evaluated by virtue of the dietary diversity score (DDS).[53] Some studies declare that lower DDS[54,55,56] is related to lower body mass index (BMI); just one study has shown that their association is inverse.[57,58] As energy intake increases along with DDS,[59] the lower food group variety causes lower energy intake;[34] so it is essential to eat just a special kind of food. Dietary habits that can help obese persons to keep their lost weight are self-efficiency, cognitive control, monitoring weight, correct dietary choices, high levels of physical activity, eating more low calorie-dense foods, and lower portion size.[6,7,28,29,30,32] Unfortunately, most of the individuals who have lost weight successfully, give up healthy behaviors after the weight loss period.[12] Although the special foods do not have a confirmed role in weight maintenance, other foods with a high amount of isoflavones may be effective in weight maintenance. Soy products are foods with a high amount of isoflavones.[60,61,62,63] However, we have not documented researches in this field. Therefore, it is suggested to be considered in future researches. Some specific behavior also may be effective in weight maintenance. Previous publications have shown that sleep deprivation may be associated with obesity and central adiposity.[64] Therefore, whether or not sleep duration is related to weight maintenance needs to be made clear in the future. Other behaviors also need to be assessed in this regard.
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